Amy Kimberlain

Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian at Baptist Health South Florida, explains soluble fiber versus insoluble fiber: “The soluble fiber is that gel-like substance that is helping to move things through and does not let things adhere to the artery walls,” she says. This type of fiber can be found in oatmeal and apples, for example.

According to her, the insoluble fiber is one that does not dissolve in water and it is moving things through the digestive tract. It can be found in wheat flours and lentils. Hydration is very important, especially in South Florida. Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, advises going back to game plan and knowing how long and how many drinks people have and spacing them out.

Soda or the alcoholic beverages are empty non-nutritive calories and drinking more versus eating It’s not healthy. Vegetables could be an alternative for staying hydrated, she says.

She recommends a balanced and healthy menu and control portions for people with diabetes. If food has been left outside for more than two hours, It’s necessary to decide to refrigerate it or reheat it for preventing the spread of bacteria. This “danger zone” is known like “Two hours mark”, explains Lucette Talamas, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida.

Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian at the same place, also advises remembering an alternative to keep away from the “danger zone”, which is the temperature control. The American Heart Association recommends replacing saturated fats with unsaturated fats to improve your health. Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian at Baptist Health South Florida, says fats are based on their source. “Whether I’m looking at fat coming from an animal source or a plant-based source, the plant-based fats (olive oil, salmon, avocado, nuts and oils) are unsaturated fats and they’re not going to cause issues with heart disease,” she points out.

She highlights all of those things coming from an animal that have saturated fat increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and we need to pay attention to how much we are consuming. When you are looking at a menu you can make small adjustments or smart choices to stay healthy. Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian at Baptist Health South Florida, says it is important picking a place that will lead you to success and not just going to a fast-food restaurant, for example.

“Try to include more vegetables where they may not be just served to you, so you can try and order them to include with the meal. Now you have the control and it’s not just being served to you,” she points out. Dietary fiber is a plant-based nutrient that passes through the intestinal tract and benefits your body. Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian at Baptist Health South Florida, says fiber is known for moving things through our digestive tract and helping us to stay regular and to avoid constipation.

According to her, it helps to lower cholesterol and blood pressure; for people with diabetes it helps control blood sugar levels and also helps with weight maintenance or weight loss. Eggs are important for your health. Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian at Baptist Health South Florida, says it is always eaten with bacon, butter and cheese. “It’s this synergistic effect, when you look back at that egg it was never the poor egg’s fault, it was who he hung out with,” she points out.

She highlights cholesterol in the egg is not raising blood cholesterol. Kimberlain recommends paying attention to what we are pairing it with and come back to the portion control. “If you’re looking to impact your blood pressure, if you’re looking to impact your cholesterol, your triglycerides and all those changes that you may need to make lead back to nutrition,” Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian at Baptist Health South Florida, recommends changing one thing at a time and really going forward.

Regarding fat, she says we want to eat more unsaturated fats than the saturated ones. So, you have to pay attention to their quality. Kale and cauliflower are food trends. Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, explains why they are trends, their benefits and how you can cook them. There is a new way of eating mushrooms. Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, explains how mushroom extract or mushroom powder can be added into the food you are eating to get its benefits and nutrients. How bacteria can improve your health? Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, explains what food products are healthy bacteria, and she also talks about probiotics and prebiotics, and the difference between them. Non-starchy vegetables have a lot of fiber and Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, advises consuming them in natural presentation, non-fried, in juices or smoothies.
She explains fiber helps patients feel fuller longer.
The expert says it’s critical to introduce non-starchy vegetables in healthy daily diet. How do you monitor glucose levels at home? Is it possible? Jennifer Miles Nyugen, Specialty Pharmacist Clinical Coordinator with Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute and Baptist Health Primary Care, and Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, walk us through what a typical self-monitoring of blood glucose device is. More than 1/3 of the population have prediabetes, according to Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald and the majority don’t know it.
Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, affirms the most important
reason is that people are not going to the doctor.
There are a multitude of reasons why people may not know, but that is the reason for a risk assessment test. If we know we can prevent it and delay the onset, there is the key, she adds. Diet, exercise and weight loss are the three components that someone would target in order to prevent diabetes or prediabetes, says Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida.
She affirms everybody should be alert about the portions, quantity and quality of the food combined.
The specialist explains the Diabetes Prevention Program Study Results and she affirms with change of eat and physical habits it is possible to improve the risks of developing diabetes in 58%.
Metformin is the medication given in prediabetes or diabetes to help suppress the liver from over producing glucose, she says. Lucette Talamas, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, says is not a good idea to skip meals during the day.

She advises, if someone has a special meal, having a light breakfast and light lunch if there’s a special situation, an early dinner.

The expert says skipping meals is unhealthy and it makes a patient go into celebration hungry. Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, explains the overnight oats are putting in a glass rolled oats, chia seeds, a little bit of peanut butter, cinnamon and a splash of vanilla with milk.

The idea is to seal it up, put it in the refrigerator overnight and the next morning it is ready to drink. “The thing I did not add in was sugar. It has natural sugar from milk or oats.” There is an extensive variety of probiotics. Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, explains the most common types: lactobacillus, lactococcus, and bifidobacterium. With a graphic, Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, describes the most common symptoms of diabetes which are: frequent urination, feeling tired or lethargic, thirsty, hunger, weakness, weight loss, blurred vision, nausea and slow healing of cuts.

However, she affirms patients with prediabetes have no symptoms.

She advises paying attention to people’s body and what someone feels.

Also, she recommends doing blood tests for understanding better what’s going on. Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, talks about different tests for diagnosing diabetes or prediabetes.
She advises doing fasting plasma glucose and according with the values, patients can be diagnosed correctly.
The expert explains something under 100 indicates everything is ok, but something above 126 would be indicative of possibly diabetes, she explains.
A1C and oral glucose tolerance tests are also important. Also, she says if someone has had a fasting level elevated or surfaced, she recommends doing the tests again. Is food trend the same as food fad? Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, explains the difference between them, and gives examples of each type. The American Heart Association and the ACSM American College of Sports Medicine recommend accomplishing 150 minutes of physical activity in an entire week. Chantis Mantilla, Exercise Physiologist at Baptist Health South Florida, says you can accomplish 10 minutes at a time.

She points out you can also do at least two days of moderate to vigorous strength activity for preventing heart disease. Walking, jogging, swimming, dancing and biking benefit your heart. Carla Duenas, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, says it really doesn’t matter how many calories a person is consuming throughout the day, as long as those meals are spread out throughout the day.

She recommends having three meals and two snacks (in the morning and in the afternoon).

The Registered Dietitian explains the body needs energy even three or four hours and food is fuel for it. That cycle is the best to keep satiety and hunger control as well. What is the new trend on eating pasta? Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, explains the new thing about eating pasta is looking for different sources to make it not from wheat, and other versions you can have that taste good. Do you eat enough vegetables? Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, gives some recommendations to get more vegetables in your diet, and how planning can be very helpful for your eating habits. Can a person with diabetes use honey and sugar? How can they sweeten up their food? Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, explains why she considers that maple syrup, sugar and agave are the same thing. Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, explains one way to deal with picky eaters is getting them involved by taking basil from the garden and turning it into pesto. “It is the vision of seeing what it is and turning it into something you can eat, versus a greenleaf that smells weird.”

She says it is about communication and letting the kids to be involved in the kitchen, and motivating them to try new things. What is your risk for diabetes? Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, explains there is a test to know if you are near to get a diagnose of diabetes. The test has questions, such are age, gender, previous diagnosis of gestational diabetes, family history, and high blood pressure, among others. Seven different questions, about age, gender, heredity, blood pressure, weight, gestational diabetes and physical activity, can help have a prediabetes diagnosis .
Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, affirms if someone scored five or higher than the indicated levels, he is at risk of prediabetes. Those risk factors are modifiable, she says.
The expert affirms there are higher levels of diabetes incidence in African Americans, Hispanics, Asian Pacific Islanders, Native Americans and in some Asian American. Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, explains the difference between healthy and non-healthy food, for example brown rice vs. white rice.
She also talks about starchy vegetables such as yucca and milonga, and she affirms they’re carbs too. She says portion of carbohydrates is important such as higher caliber fuel source. Potatoes, corn and peas are carbs, too.
However, the expert says popcorn can be a healthy whole grain. Amy Kimberlain, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, recommends the child to be eating with a family member at least once a day, because it has benefits such as better improvement in school, stronger family relationships, and a healthy eating.

The American Heart Association says kids age 2-18 should have less than 25 grams or 6 teaspoons of added sugars daily for a healthy heart. Carla Duenas, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, recommends having separate cutting boards for fruits, vegetables, meats and fish in order to avoid spreading bacteria. The three most common bacteria are: salmonella, E-coli and listeria.

The specialist also recommends not using the same plate for the cooked meats and the raw meals, especially salads. Any processed meats are not recommended to be eaten at any point, because they are classified by World Health Organization as carcinogens, affirms Lucette Talamas, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida.

She advises decreasing the frequency and portion of any processed meats.

Carla Duenas, Registered Dietitian at the same place, also recommends not eating frequently meat, chicken or fish cooked at high temperature, because they can be carcinogen. “The recommendation is cooking over medium heat,” she says. Trying to get the lowest possible fat, when reading the numbers on the label when buying a product is the best way to understand the nutritional information of any product.

Carla Duenas, Registered Dietitian with Baptist Health South Florida, explains with a graphic what the numbers mean.

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