Dr. Andre Anderson

Dr. Andre Anderson, Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellow with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, says some of the common injuries are the lower extremity injuries, and as physicians they have to know how to deal with them on the field.

Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, explains if the athlete is a minor, they are coming out the field to be evaluated and they are probably done for the day. Dr. Andre Anderson, Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellow with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, says gravity is a sub-component of the urine that gives them an idea of how concentrated the urine is. “When it’s very concentrated it is heavier and we know that the patient or the athlete is dehydrated.”

Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, explains electrolytes are essential. “If you’re competing in an activity that is about an hour or longer, you should definitely have a beverage that has some electrolytes in it.” Dr. Andre Anderson, Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellow with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, says it is important for marathon runners to carb up, because it is a great source of fuel. “We have a dietitian talking to the athletes so they know the importance of carb loading, especially during or before a big event like a marathon.”

Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, explains it is important to experiment. “Everyone wants to do their best, and practice is what helps out the most. Practicing not only your sport, but actually fueling yourself for the sport is an important concept.” Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, explains in all massive events they have to decide what is the temperature to combat heat exhaustion. “We look at the weather, the website or our phone, and it tells you the temperature. We also use the feels like temperature, so we have something a little more precise. It takes account of the sun, your altitude, the humidity, the wind speed and the actual ambient temperature, and it comes up with a much more accurate number as to what the athletes are feeling right now at that spot.”

Dr. Andre Anderson, Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellow with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, says he does not advice drinking coffee before physical activities like running, because it does speed up the heart rate.

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