Dr. Michael Swartzon

Sports Medicine Dr. Michael Swartzon says that even professional athletes are susceptible to injuries. “The moment you have an injury, that’s the number one risk factor for you to have the injury again,” Swartzon explains.

In addition, the specialist mentions the orthopedics job is “to prevent it from happening again”.

For patients who have had shoulder tendinitis, Dr. Swartzon recommends “concentrating on strengthening your shoulder before trying to do an activity.” Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute, talks about regenerative medicine.

He affirms there is no cure for arthritis, for example. “The options for people are to live with it or have a surgery to replace the joint,” he says. Dr. Michael Swartzon says that there are several factors that cause shoulder tendinitis. According to the specialist, when playing tennis, perhaps the equipment is very heavy or the ropes are not at the right pressure, which causes the overuse of the shoulder.

Sometimes, according to the physician, tendinitis being an inflammation could take a few hours or a couple of days for that process to take hold. “Once the inflammation happens that’s when you start to feel the pain,” says Swartzon. Headache, dizziness, confusion, memory issues and stumbling when walking are the first symptoms of concussion, says Sports Medicine Physician Dr. Michael Swartzon at Miami Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Institute.

The specialist explains to know if an athlete may be having one of these episodes, It’s enough to see how they get up after a fall, or how they answer some simple questions after having suffered a traumatic episode. Stem cell is concerned with one specific type of cell that’s trying to do one specific job. In sport medicine, orthopedics physicians use the term ortho biologics explains Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute.

He uses stem cells mainly for musculoskeletal conditions for regeneration, he says Athletes are generally the ones to try the investigatory treatments first, like stem cells therapy.

Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute, explains the rate of success in those cases is high.

“These players are able to come back quicker and they have longer careers,” he says. Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute, affirms he has no objections to try stem cell therapy in older adults.

However, when the person gets older, the quality of the stem cells that are extracted do not have the same quality as those that can be obtained when you are 30 years old. “As you age, there’s slightly less we can get,” he says. Stem cell therapy is able to get nerves and joints to recover faster, says Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute.

Also, these therapies make recovery possible and the doctor wishes them the best success Dr. Michael Swartzon says most of the times patients take weeks or months with pain before going to emergency room.

A factor that influences the incidence of pain is age. “When you’re young and you rest for a day or two a lot of times the pain goes away. When you’re older sometimes it lingers a little bit, some people might try some rest, take over-the-counter anti-inflammatory,” says Swatzon.

However, when the pain persists, the specialist recommends, going to see a physician. Over-the-counter pain relievers such as ibuprofen, acetaminophen or anti-inflammatories are generally the most common medications used to recover from injuries. If this medication doesn’t work, the physician can prescribe other types of drugs.

Dr. Michael Swartzon, Sports Medicine Physician at Miami Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Institute, affirms any type of medication should be prescribed by a doctor, because there are drugs that usually interact with organs, such as the heart, kidney and, even, with blood pressure, and they should be monitored. Dr. Michael Swartzon explains the shoulder is a wonderful joint that allows have movements forward, out, back and different variations of the rotation. He agrees that everything in the shoulder is related to move it properly.

The rotator cuff is one of the elements that tend to wear out the most. The specialist adds “Behind the shoulder blade there are four muscles and tendons that control a majority of the movements.”

When a person uses one muscle or tendons over and over again the shoulder can suffer. It must be used according to its capacity. Rejuvenation treatments are safe, but they’re not covered by insurance, there are no clear indications by the government and are investigatory, explains Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute.

The doctor recommends patients to be very careful if they decide to do those type of treatments. Tendons and ligaments would be the most common sport injuries, says Dr. Michael Swartzon, Sports Medicine Physician at Miami Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Institute, and adds there are a lot of fractures too and people get bone bruises very often.

With a 3D imaging, the doctor explains what happens with the torn ligament. In this case, surgery is needed. Physical therapy is the main method for returning back to daily life, says Dr. Michael Swartzon, Sports Medicine Physician at Miami Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Institute.

Anti-gravity treadmill is one of the most used treatment devices in physical therapy. In a video, the doctor explains that It’s used for recovering from any injury or fracture.

It can help people exercise at a reduced body weight, he says. Dr. Michael Swartzon, Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician at Miami Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute, explains doctors use a scat, a sideline concussion assessment tool to keep some objective evidence and visit to visit they can see how many symptoms a patient has and how severe they are.

He also says they do memory evaluation and balance testing to make a clinical diagnosis. Stem cells have good and promising results for full recovery from injuries, says Dr. Michael Swartzon, Sports Medicine Physician at Miami Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Institute.

Stem cell is the cell that can differentiate or change into other types of cell. It normally sits more in the bone marrow or in the bone and then gets released as needed.

The stem cell treatment is trying to replicate the body’s repair mechanism “by doctors taking those workers and then putting them where they need to do the work,” he says. The more severe the case, the less of a chance of something like PRP (Platelet-rich Plasma) or stem cells working, says Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute.

“When we put in the cells like the PRP or the stem cells, what we’re trying to do is changing that environment from one of like I said destruction to one of calmness hopefully rejuvenation and trying to modulate all that biochemistry and turn off the things that are causing the destruction,” he says. Dr. Michael Swartzon, Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician at Miami Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute, explains a concussion is any change in the neurological status (memory, balance) of a person that occurs after any kind of trauma.

He also says it doesn’t have to be a hit to the head, it’s anything that results in force to the head. “The brain sits in the skull, there’s a space between the bone of the skull and the soft tissue of the brain. In that soft tissue there’s a liquid, your cerebral spinal fluid, and it acts as a buffer. You can think of it as a yolk in an egg. If I shake that egg, it could cause a problem even if the egg doesn’t crack,” he points out. Dr. Michael Swartzon, Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician at Miami Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute, says 60 minutes before every NFL game the medical staffs for both teams, trainers and consultants meet so that they all recognize each other’s faces and they can find each other on the sidelines.

He explains they are also connected by headphones and it is with teamwork communication vigilance that they screen as much as possible to be prepared in case of a possible concussion. Supporting repair of damage tissue, reducing inflammation, slowing healing process and promoting soft tissue reconstruction are some of the things stem cells can do.

Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute, also says actually some studies show that stem cells can improve fracture healing and bone, healing of soft tissue and they are a very good treatment for tennis elbow. Patient-physiatrist communication is essential to guarantee the success of the recovery plan after any type of injury.

Dr. Michael Swartzon, Sports Medicine Physician at Miami Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Institute recommends the patients to be very active participants when they visit the physician, make all the questions, exercise at home and tell the doctor what their goals are. Headache, vomiting or nausea, trouble thinking normally, memory problems, trouble walking, dizziness, vision problems, fatigue, mood changes and changes in sleep patterns are signs of a concussion.

Dr. Michael Swartzon, Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician at Miami Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute, says any trauma to the head can result in a headache: “When people get a headache after a trauma, we’re very concerned that it might be related to a concussion; if they start to stumble, that’s a very good sign, that person should be evaluated for a concussion.” Dr. Michael Swartzon, Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician at Miami Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute, says blacking out possibly after some kind of a trauma is perhaps a sign you’re dealing with a concussion.

“I’m not saying that if you don’t black out, you don’t have a concussion, what I’m saying is that if you blacked out I don’t see how you don’t have a concussion,” he highlights. What can you do to improve your running skills? Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, gives us some recommendations, such as trying shorter races, and being patient with yourself. What do you need to complete a marathon? Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, talks about the physical capacity to run a marathon and the importance of mental patience to achieve the goal. Hydration is an important key for running a marathon. Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, talks about some tips, such as pre-run hydration, and knowing your sweat rate. What you should do after a marathon? Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, says the way to recover from a marathon is resting, and talks about other options, such as refueling and keeping moving. Marathon’s organization counts with professional medical care for the runners. Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, talks about what they do on a race day and how they treat injuries. Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute, explains the growth plate builds bone for growth.

15 % of pediatric fractures are in the growth plate and can be a concern for both parents and physicians, the doctor says. Tendonitis is not as common in younger athletes as in adults, says Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute.

The experts also affirms 50% or more of the pediatric injuries or more are overuse.

Rest and rehab are crucial to avoiding overuse injuries in the bones or ligaments, he adds. There are marathons every year, and many runners train every day, but how doctors are involved with the race? Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, talks about how physicians have stations every few miles with medical personnel to help and assist runners with minor injuries, and what happens if there are major injuries. Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, explains when athletes are wearing their gear the heat has nowhere to go. “It creates this environment where all the heat and humidity stays in. It’s important that they take their helmet off so the hot air can escape.”

He also says having a fan or hydrating is very helpful. What is the ideal age to start running? Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, explains what things yo can do to start running at any age, like going to running clubs so they can teach you how to run; and he also talks about the amount of time recommended for running. Running helps you lose weight and reduce the risk for stroke. Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, talks about the benefits of running, such as it reduces the risks for type 2 diabetes and certain cancers, among others. Parent support is essential in cases of kids’ injuries. Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute, affirms he encourages parents to see another physician in case of doubts.

He says with the teams he works for and the experience he has, he can explain to the parents and the child what is all the athletes go through. Achilles tendonitis and plantar fasciitis are some common injuries runners might suffer from. Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, talks about them and more, such as runner’s knee, shin splints, and hamstring issues. What is the role of drinking water in doing a marathon? Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, explains the importance of maintaining the body hydrated with water, but also with carbohydrate beverages, because you need to replace electrolytes. What do you do before running a marathon? Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, gives us some tips, such as knowing your limits, choosing your race event, and resting, among others. Dr. Andre Anderson, Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellow with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, says it is important for marathon runners to carb up, because it is a great source of fuel. “We have a dietitian talking to the athletes so they know the importance of carb loading, especially during or before a big event like a marathon.”

Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, explains it is important to experiment. “Everyone wants to do their best, and practice is what helps out the most. Practicing not only your sport, but actually fueling yourself for the sport is an important concept.” Dr. Andre Anderson, Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellow with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, says some of the common injuries are the lower extremity injuries, and as physicians they have to know how to deal with them on the field.

Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, explains if the athlete is a minor, they are coming out the field to be evaluated and they are probably done for the day. Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, explains a urine color chart and says if your urine is syrup or brown ale and it doesn’t change quickly, you need to seek medical attention.

“The dark yellow is not advisable, it is when maybe you feel thirsty, you are ignoring your thirst, and your body is telling you that you are dehydrated and you should take in a couple of glasses of water”. ACL is a ligament in the knee. Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute, affirms when ACL causes pain, it requires reconstruction. Its surgery leads to a prolonged recovery.

The doctor describes ACL is supposed to hold the lower leg to the upper leg. If it doesn’t exist, a rotational force will cause the person to feel unstable and he will not be able to continue practicing sports such as basketball or tennis. There are some signs of an emergency, such as a joint or bone that is clearly broken or dislocated; inability to support any weight on affected area; extreme pain that is progressively getting worse; paralysis, tingling, or numbness; and unsteady breathing or pulse.

Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, says none of the games in Miami Dade can start without the physician being present, so there is someone there to help you or the coaches or the athletic training staff and parents decide if this person is okay to go back or not. The recovery of sports injuries in children is more difficult because they don’t communicate as well as adults and find it harder to follow the instructions.

Dr. Michael Swartzon, Medical Orthopedist and Primary Care Sports Medicine of the Institute of Sports Medicine and Orthopedics of Miami, also explains when children are removed from sports, because they must rest, they can be affected. In their case, it’s important to take into account the mental part.

The doctor advises helping children with physiotherapists, because they are better with the pediatric population. The most common injuries in kids are: sprains and strains, stress fractures, injuries to growth plates and concussions.

Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute, explains sprain is also called injury to a ligament, which is a piece of the connective tissue made of collagen. It provides stability from the ankle. The expert also says sprain, by definition, is damage to the ligament.

He also states a split tear, partial tear or complete tear are considered sprains. Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, explains in all massive events they have to decide what is the temperature to combat heat exhaustion. “We look at the weather, the website or our phone, and it tells you the temperature. We also use the feels like temperature, so we have something a little more precise. It takes account of the sun, your altitude, the humidity, the wind speed and the actual ambient temperature, and it comes up with a much more accurate number as to what the athletes are feeling right now at that spot.”

Dr. Andre Anderson, Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellow with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, says he does not advice drinking coffee before physical activities like running, because it does speed up the heart rate. There are some recommendations for preventing injuries in kids and teens: war protective gear, playing by the rules, avoiding overplaying, considering other health conditions, warming up beforehand, avoiding hot-weather injury and avoiding rushing back after injury.

Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute, affirms all of these recommendations are crucial and there is no one less important than the other.

Kids need one day off every seven days and they should be taken one month off every six months from a particular sport. Dr. Andre Anderson, Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellow with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, says gravity is a sub-component of the urine that gives them an idea of how concentrated the urine is. “When it’s very concentrated it is heavier and we know that the patient or the athlete is dehydrated.”

Dr. Michael Swartzon, Primary Care Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Physician with Miami Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute, explains electrolytes are essential. “If you’re competing in an activity that is about an hour or longer, you should definitely have a beverage that has some electrolytes in it.”

Videos

DISCLAIMER: The information and opinions expressed in the programs on this channel and website are intended to address specific questions asked or situations described in each particular program, are for educational purposes only, and are not designed to constitute advice or recommendations as to any disease, ailment, or physical condition. You should not act or rely upon any information contained in these programs without seeking the advice of your personal physician or a qualified medical provider. If you have any questions about the information or opinions expressed, please contact your doctor or other medical professional.