Thi Squire

Are you consuming high quality food? Thi Squire, Community Garden Project Manager of the Grow2Heal Garden at Homestead Hospital, explains how you can determine the quality of your food by paying attention to the growing technique, freshness, and additives, for example. Portion size is a great way to start cutting down on sugar. Thi Squire, Community Garden Project Manager of the Grow2Heal Garden at Homestead Hospital, gives some tips to avoid the temptation of consuming too much sugar. Do you know what ‘the Salty 6’ is? Thi Squire, Community Garden Project Manager of the Grow2Heal Garden at Homestead Hospital, talks about these 6 groups of heavily processed food that are not just canned or frozen, and how they can affect your body and health. There are processed foods that are good for your health. Thi Squire, Community Garden Project Manager of the Grow2Heal Garden at Homestead Hospital, explains why you should eat yogurt, oatmeal, pasteurized milk, frozen fruits and vegetables, among others. Thi Squire, Community Garden Project Manager of the Grow2Heal Garden at Homestead Hospital, says Edible South Florida is a magazine that gives you all sorts of food information in South Florida; it is a guide to healthy eating.

The magazine has descriptions of various types of vegetables, how to prepare them, how to store them, and healthy tips. Grow2Heal educates the community of South Florida because it has field trips, health fairs, cooking demonstrations, wellness workshops, and support groups.

Thi Squire, Community Garden Project Manager of the Grow2Heal Garden at Homestead Hospital, says they do cooking demonstrations using what they just harvested. They have a program called Grow Your Lunch, which is an opportunity for students to get reconnected to the environment, and to see how their food is grown. Drew Thomason, Executive Chef at Homestead Hospital, explains they personalize meals for patients coming into the hospital that are in recovery process. He highlights there is a stigma about hospital food. They are trying to bring in fresh and local ingredients to promote a healthier way of living.

Thi Squire, Community Garden Project Manager of the Grow2Heal Garden at Homestead Hospital, says they are trying to change the food system within health care. Thi Squire, Community Garden Project Manager of the Grow2Heal Garden at Homestead Hospital, says life starts with food; and what you consume affects how you feel, not just physically but also emotionally. According to her, what you eat can determine your health outcome.

She explains there are a lot of healing qualities in many of the foods they have. She points out that each color of vegetables represents a different health benefit that you can receive. For example, turmeric has a lot of anti-inflammatory qualities. Drew Thomason, Executive Chef at Homestead Hospital, recommends buying vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins, such as chicken, ground turkey, and fish (red grouper, salmon). Regarding red meat, he suggests taking a lower portion size.

Thi Squire, Community Garden Project Manager of the Grow2Heal Garden at Homestead Hospital, explains processed foods have artificial ingredients that can cause inflammation. Thi Squire, Community Garden Project Manager of the Grow2Heal Garden at Homestead Hospital, explains Grow2Heal is an opportunity to grow organic foods and feed their patients. They have carrots, heirloom tomatoes, radishes, lettuce, broccoli, beans, and some fruits, among others.

Drew Thomason, Executive Chef at Homestead Hospital, says they do meal prep, planning a week ahead to make sure the amount of food they need for cooking.

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