Medication for Cold during Pregnancy




Dr. Ellen Schwartzbard, Obstetrician and Gynecologist with Baptist Health South Florida, advises trying to avoid to take any medication at all during the first trimester of pregnancy, but it’s absolutely necessary to take something for cold or allergies. She recommends consulting with the physician.

After this time, she affirms it is a little bit safer to take a larger variation of medication.

Transcript
So what do you tell your patients yes you can take and no don’t touch it if you have just a simple cold or allergy? Right well in the first trimester you really want to try to avoid to take anything at all if you can avoid it the first trimester is really an important time of development all those organs are being formed and most medications are not tested in pregnancy but tylenol. I tell my patients it’s okay to take tylenol you really want to avoid the nonsteroidals that would be your motrin no aspirin at all and really if there’s anything going on ask your doctor and that’s the safest thing to do. But be careful because we always hear about over-the-counter medications if you have a cold I mean I know people who lock up on sudafed as soon as they get a cold I mean that’s got to be a red light to anybody right away to be very careful do you really have to tell people that sometimes it look you’re pregnant now do not just go over the counter and grab something or do people have again some level of common sense to be able to think that through. Right well all the medications when you read that label they’re going to say ask your doctor and they do the allergy medications is a pretty safe group to take you know your zyrtec your Allegra so that will frequently help people when they are sick and after the first trimester it is a little bit safer to take a larger variation of medication for colds and other problems so the safest thing to do is to always ask.
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