Pregnancy: First Prenatal Visit



After having a positive pregnancy test, what happens in the very first prenatal visit? Dr. Eduardo Valdes, Obstetrician and Gynecologist with Baptist Health South Florida, explains they get a full history of the patient, do a full physical exam and many other tests.

Transcript
And it’s time for your first prenatal visit right so a lot of moms I know I went in there thinking oh my God we’re gonna do a sonogram we’re gonna see the baby this is amazing I saw how it works so what happens in that really first visit you’re like 4 to 6 weeks your first prenatal visit so usually it depends on and for us when they come in we usually get a full physical full history of the patient and then we will we will do a full physical exam including the pelvic exam any tests that we need to be performed at that time any screening tests including the genetics test those are all blood works and then hopefully we always at least with us we always do a transvaginal sonogram so that we can localize and find the pregnancy which is the most important thing to make sure that pregnancies in the uterus and that it’s it’s growing and developing appropriately and in some cases depending on how far along the patient is we can hear a heartbeat at that time and so we can ensure a patient will usually get a sonogram and that first visit just to localize the pregnancy and dr. Brenda’s let’s discuss a transvaginal sonogram because as I learned during pregnancy when you’re too early you can actually do an ultrasound so you have to do a transvaginal is true so if you’re too early depending on the gestational age obviously transit dominantly is a little more difficult since the part the uterus is done tucked away in the pelvis turns abdominally it’s a little more difficult to see the uterus so transvaginal sonograms are a little easier because the probe is right on top of the uterus and you can localize and see the the pregnancy a little easier you.
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