Types of Back Pain

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Acute (lasts less than 4 weeks), subacute (4 to 12 weeks) and chronic (more than 12 weeks) are the types of back pain.
Amir Mahajer, Interventional Spine Specialist at Baptist Health Neuroscience Center, says acute back pain is very common and everybody is going to feel some back pain in his or her life.
He explains the other two types are the reasons why we start visiting the doctor to receive a treatment. In the United States the cases of chronic back pain are increasing so the patient does not have to wait until the pain is unbearable to ask for help.

Transcript
Different types of back pain I want to break it down for our viewers before we start discussing how to help them get back on their feet there is doctor acute subacute and chronic so let’s show our viewers what those are and let’s break it down for them so they can understand what is happening acute first of all lasts less than four weeks and when a patient is experiencing that what kind of pain are we talking about? So we’re talking about temporal or a time course as far as back pain goes so acute back pain and sometimes we discuss this as early acute which can be two weeks so early acute or acute four weeks of back pain can is very common it hasn’t really changed over the last ten years in the United States and everyone’s gonna experience some back pain in their lives different types of back pain include a nonspecific back pain which is pain that’s localized to low back and doesn’t really go into the legs doesn’t radiate we call that axial low back pain and that’s very typical we also can have radiating lower back pain that common phrase is sciatica or ridiculo back pain are sometimes caused from acute lumbar radiculopathy with it just the topic we’re discussing right now. Let’s look at the last two which is sub acute and chronic describe those two for me one lasts about 4 to 12 weeks the other one according to that graphic lasts more than 12 weeks. Usually that’s the time we start getting into the into the doctors visits is that the sub acute time period most of us experience a few days or a week of back pain and we try to get over and get better and then if it doesn’t then typically we go into the doctor’s office we start getting some treatment in the sub acute phase unless if it’s acute and severe and then the chronic phase is really where we have to where we’re challenged because at this time in the United States and developed countries chronic lower back pain has increased actually whereas in the acute phase it really hasn’t changed.
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