Chantis Mantilla, Ph.D.

Resistance bands are very useful to do exercise at home. Chantis Mantilla, Ph.D., Exercise Physiologist at Baptist Health South Florida, says strength training is another important piece of physical activity, it is not just cardio what we have to do.

“We should try to incorporate strength activities and a variety of them at least two times a week. With someone who has heart disease it is better to do low resistance higher repetition, because they are building the muscles, they are helping with bone development and maintenance without putting yourself at risk for that high blood pressure,” she explains. Walking, jogging, swimming, dancing and biking are great physical activities that benefit your heart. Chantis Mantilla, Ph.D., Exercise Physiologist at Baptist Health South Florida, says the biggest thing to remember is that we really want to be in that moderate to vigorous range, so you should not be able to sing while exercising.

Carla Duenas, Registered Dietitian at Baptist Health South Florida, points out the activity you choose have to be one that you really enjoy and stick to it. Carla Duenas, Registered Dietitian at Baptist Health South Florida, recommends having one teaspoon of salt throughout the day and if you have high blood pressure is less than that, it’s about half of a teaspoon. She says you really have to be mindful of where and what are you eating.

Chantis Mantilla, Ph.D., Exercise Physiologist at Baptist Health South Florida, points out eating healthy will become a habit at some point and the same will happen with exercising if you make the effort. High blood pressure affects one out of three American adults and it can lead to serious consequences, like heart disease. Chantis Mantilla, Ph.D., Exercise Physiologist at Baptist Health South Florida, says exercise is essential for our health.

The American Heart recommends exercise for 150 minutes in a week and, in addition, you should be doing at least two days of moderate strength building. It is very important to know your heart rate and also to learn how to take it. Chantis Mantilla, Ph.D., Exercise Physiologist at Baptist Health South Florida, says the best way to find it is taking it in the morning and should be between 100-170 beats per minute if you are 20 years old; 95-153 bpm if you are 40 years old, for example.

She also explains your target heart rate zone should be between 50 and 85% and the maximum heart rate will be the 100% and can be taken after doing moderate or vigorous exercise.

Videos

DISCLAIMER: The information and opinions expressed in the programs on this channel and website are intended to address specific questions asked or situations described in each particular program, are for educational purposes only, and are not designed to constitute advice or recommendations as to any disease, ailment, or physical condition. You should not act or rely upon any information contained in these programs without seeking the advice of your personal physician or a qualified medical provider. If you have any questions about the information or opinions expressed, please contact your doctor or other medical professional.