Poor Diet, Poor Habits

Poor diet is associated with poor habits and if they’re in combination, they affect the patient’s health, affirms Dr. Milton Jimenez, Primary care Physician with West Kendall Baptist Hospital.

Sometimes, both can cause obesity, and obesity is a cause of risks of many other health problems such as hypertension, cancer, dementia and diabetes, the doctor describes.

He recommends the Mediterranean diet, because there is scientific evidence proving that it is effective and it decreases the risk of many diseases, and there is less incidence of Parkinson and dementia, he says.

Transcript
Let’s talk about how a poor diet and obesity can affect seniors. >A poor diet is usually associated with poor habits and both in combination will definitely sabotage the health of a person because it will lead you to obesity also and obesity is a cause of many other things many other problems it will place you at risk for cancer it will place your risk for hypertension diabetes so it is very detrimental a poor diet. >Okay so and you know picking up on something we did talk about a little bit earlier is that the Alzheimer’s Association also agrees what we eat may have an impact of course on how we feel and what happens on our brain health and the Association specifically recommends the Mediterranean diet again we again touched on it talking about a little very little red meat mostly fish also vegetables olive oil just again doctor your take on that diet in particular and you know why it might be good for us to consider following. >The reason why the Mediterranean diet has become so popular in in health care is because it has the scientific evidence to prove that is effective and what it has proven is that it decreases the risk for many diseases and it decreases the cardiovascular risk it decreases mortality also there is less incidence of Parkinson and dementia in persons who follow the Mediterranean diet.
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